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Difference between case and point or case in point

case and point or case in point

When exploring the nuances of language, particularly phrases that sound similar, it’s crucial to understand the grammar and semantics behind each term. “Case and Point” and “Case in Point” are often confused due to their phonetic similarities, yet only one of them is grammatically correct and holds significance in English language usage.

Quick Facts Table

FeatureCase and PointCase in Point
Correct UsageNot applicableYes
MeaningN/AA specific example that illustrates a broader point
Common UsageMisheard or misused phraseWidely used to refer to an example or illustration
Part of SpeechN/APhrase (Prepositional)
Language OriginResult of mishearing or misinterpretationEnglish

Difference Between “Case and Point” and “Case in Point”

Definition of Case and Point

Case and Point is a common mishearing or misinterpretation of the correct phrase "case in point." It does not hold any recognized meaning in English and is considered a grammatical mistake when used in writing or speech.

Definition of Case in Point

Case in Point is a phrase used to introduce an example that supports or illustrates a broader argument or claim. It signifies that the following information serves as direct evidence or clarification of the point being discussed.

Origin of Case and Point

  • Case and Point does not have a specific origin as it is not a recognized phrase in the English language. It emerges from the misinterpretation or mishearing of the correct expression.

Origin of Case in Point

  • Case in Point originates from legal terminology, where it referred to a case (legal matter) that was relevant or pertinent to the point being argued or discussed. Over time, its use expanded beyond legal contexts to general English.

Pronunciation

  • Case and Point and Case in Point are pronounced similarly, which is why they are often confused. However, only “case in point” is the correct phrase and it is pronounced as /keɪs ɪn pɔɪnt/.

Comparing Case and Point and Case in Point

FeatureCase and PointCase in Point
UsageIncorrectly used as an attempt to say “case in point”Correctly used to introduce an example that illustrates a broader point
MeaningN/AA specific example that supports a broader argument
ContextNon-existent in proper EnglishAcademic writing, speeches, everyday conversation
Recognized by dictionariesNoYes

Usage in Sentences with Explanations

Use of Case and Point in Sentences

Since “case and point” is not a recognized phrase, providing examples of its correct use is not applicable. It is important to avoid using this phrase in formal or informal settings.

Use of Case in Point in Sentences

  1. The recent budget cuts in education are a case in point of the government’s priorities shifting away from public welfare. (This sentence illustrates how the example of budget cuts supports the broader argument about government priorities.)
  2. Her ability to solve complex problems quickly is a case in point of why she was promoted. (Here, her problem-solving skills serve as direct evidence of her competence, justifying her promotion.)
  3. The rapid growth of renewable energy sources is a case in point that sustainable development is achievable. (This example underscores the argument that sustainable development is not only a concept but a reality.)
  4. This historical event is a case in point showing how economic crises can lead to political upheaval. (The event cited serves as an example illustrating the connection between economic crises and political changes.)
  5. His meticulous attention to detail in the project report is a case in point of his dedication to quality. (The detailed project report exemplifies his overall dedication to producing quality work.)

Conclusion

Understanding the difference between “case and point” and “case in point” is essential for clear and effective communication. “Case in point” is the correct phrase, used to introduce an example that illustrates a broader argument or claim. It’s important to recognize and correct the misuse of “case and point” to maintain the integrity and clarity of our language.

Commonly Asked Questions

  • Is “case and point” ever correct to use?
    • No, “case and point” is not recognized as a correct phrase in English. The correct phrase is “case in point.”
  • How can I remember to use “case in point” correctly?
    • Remember that “in” suggests that the example is contained within or part of the broader point you’re discussing. Visualize the example fitting “in” your argument.
  • Can “case in point” be used in formal writing?
    • Yes, “case in point” is appropriate for formal writing and is useful for clarifying or supporting an argument with a specific example.
Jessica Smith

Jessica Smith

Jessica Smith, writer at TexTribe.co.uk, blends creativity with insight, exploring technology, culture, and psychology. With a background in English Literature, she crafts engaging stories inspired by nature and urban life. Outside writing, she enjoys exploring and continuous learning.View Author posts

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